In the News

News and Headlines. 10/22/2019

News and Headlines: In The News, Immigration, Politics, World News, Commentary/Opinion.

In The News:

Always takes female symbol off its packaging to be inclusive of transgender, nonbinary customers

Proctor & Gamble, Always' parent company, announced that it will redesign its pad products to be more inclusive.
Proctor & Gamble, Always’ parent company, announced that it will redesign its pad products to be more inclusive. Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images

Transgender activists and allies had publicly urged Proctor & Gamble to redesign its pad wrapper without the gender symbol, a circle atop a cross. Among their arguments were that not all people who menstruate are women and that not all women menstruate.

The change is the latest in a series of actions companies and governments are taking to affirm the identities of transgender people as transgender equality activism surges.

Companies including Lyft, Mastercard, and Tinder are making similar moves.

Oakland Raiders legend Willie Brown dead at 78

Willie Brown holds an autographed Riddell Raiders helmet at the Pro Bowl Footbal Festival at Kapiolani Park in Honolulu, Hawaii on Saturday, February 11, 2006.
Willie Brown holds an autographed Riddell Raiders helmet at the Pro Bowl Footbal Festival at Kapiolani Park in Honolulu, Hawaii on Saturday, February 11, 2006.
(Photo by Kirby Lee/Getty Images)

He was known for creating one of the NFL’s most iconic moments on January 9, 1977, when he raced 75 yards to the end zone to score on an interception from the Minnesota Vikings during Super Bowl XI.

Hall of Fame president and CEO David Baker said Tuesday in a release:

“Willie Brown was the epitome of the Raiders’ motto of ‘commitment to excellence’ that was integral to the team’s sustained success.

He embodied virtues like passion, integrity, perseverance and always led by example. His character, on and off the field, made all those around him better.

Local California CBS reporter fired after jumping on, damaging cars during live news segment

Angel Cardenas, a correspondent with KMAX-TV’s “Good Morning Sacramento,” was on air Sunday at the Sacramento International Auto Show, a weekend-long event at Cal Expo that was about to begin its final day.

Someone who caught the segment on air, Adam Copeland, posted a clip of it to Facebook, as he has “never seen such a disregard to someone else’s vehicle.”

“I feel like a kid in a candy store without the owners because you can do anything,” Cardenas says. He then moves on to another car, a pink Thunderbird, and opens the driver’s side door — which dings into another vehicle sitting next to it.

Brooklyn Supreme Court Justice & Former NYPD Officer Arrested, Charged In Major Credit Union Fraud Case

Justice Sylvia Ash was arrested on Oct. 11 on charges she destroyed evidence and lied to federal agents investigating corruption at Municipal Credit Union.

Prosecutors described MCU as one of the oldest and largest credit unions in the country with more than 500,000 members and about $3 billion in accounts.

Former NYPD officer Joseph Guagliardo was also arrested on embezzlement and fraud charges.

Court papers say that Ash, while serving as a board member from 2008 to 2016, “received annually tens of thousands of dollars in reimbursements and other benefits from MCU, including airfare, hotels, food, and entertainment expenses.” The credit union CEO, Kam Wong, kept some of the benefits in place even after Ash resigned, they add.

Authorities also say Guagliardo has been charged with providing Wong with a controlled substance.

Caught On Camera: Man Robbed At Gunpoint While Getting His Hair Cut At Brooklyn Barbershop

Police said a 30-year-old man was getting a haircut when another man pointed a gun at him and demanded his property.

The victim handed over $350 in cash, along with his credit cards and cellphone.

He told police he thought the suspect spotted him when he parked his BMW nearby.

States’ antitrust probe into Facebook balloons to 47 AGs

(Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

The move ups the pressure on the tech giant, which is facing expansive probes into whether it has stifled competitors from state officials, federal antitrust enforcers and U.S. lawmakers.

It marks a dramatic expansion of the multistate probe, which James announced in September alongside AGs from seven other states and the District of Columbia.

The 38 new AGs include the top cops from Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia.

A number of the states joining aren’t publicly confirming their participation due to the pending nature of the probe, James’ office said.

It made the full list of states and territories on record as participating available in a release online.

New Hampshire man accused of opening fire during wedding attacked his own attorney: police

Dale Holloway, 37, is facing an additional charge of assault in the first degree following an incident involving his court-appointed attorney at the Hillsborough County House of Corrections.
Dale Holloway, 37, is facing an additional charge of assault in the first degree following an incident involving his court-appointed attorney at the Hillsborough County House of Corrections. (Pelham Police Department)

According to a press release from the office of New Hampshire Attorney General Gordon J. MacDonald, Michael Davidow suffered “a serious head injury” after his client, Holloway, inflicted “serious bodily injury.”

Holloway was previously charged with attempted murder, felony possession of a firearm, second-degree assault and simple assault after prosecutors say he opened fire inside the New England Pentecostal Church in Pelham on October 12 at around 10 a.m.

Bishop Stanley Choate, the presiding pastor, was shot in the chest. The bride, 60-year-old Claire McCullen, suffered a gunshot wound to the arm and her husband-to-be, 60-year-old Mark Castiglione, was hit in the head with an object.

Army identifies the 3 soldiers killed when armored vehicle fell off bridge

A M2 Bradley fighting vehicle and a group of M1 Abrams tanks with the 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, secure an area during a Robotic Complex Breach Concept demonstration at Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany, April 6, 2018. The Robotic Complex Breach Concept employes the use of Robotic and Autonomous Systems (RAS) for intelligence, suppression, obscuration, and reduction missions. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Hubert D. Delany III / 22nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

The death of three U.S. Army soldiers at Fort Stewart, Georgia and the injury of three more came after their armored vehicle fell from a bridge and rolled upside down into the water below, base officials revealed Monday.

The Army identified Sgt. 1st Class Bryan Jenkins, 41, of Gainesville, Fla.; Cpl. Thomas Walker, 22, of Conneaut, Ohio; and Pfc. Antonio Garcia, 21, of Peoria, Ariz. as the three soldiers killed in a pre-dawn training accident Sunday morning, Army Times reported.

Maj. Gen. Antonio Aguto read the names of those three soldiers of 1st Armored Brigade of the Fort Stewart-based 3rd Infantry Division during a Monday news conference after Army officials completed the next-of-kin notification process.

Part 4: Alleged Sexual Misconduct by CNN Exec and Possible Cover-Up by Senior Management #MeTooCNN

• Rick Saleeby, Senior Producer of The Lead with Jake Tapper, States Steve Brusk, CNN Politics Supervising Producer, Made ‘Advances’ on Female Employees During ‘Social Gatherings’ and Would “Put His Arm Around Them, Try and Touch Their Leg.”

• Saleeby Believes That Steve Brusk is “Protected by Certain People…Like Other Higher Ups” Within CNN.
• Rick Saleeby Recalls Incident with a Young Female Colleague: “She Had a Skirt on. I Could See the Hand. I Like Grab Her. It Looked Like I Was Being the Assaulter Because I Grabbed Her So Aggressively…to Keep Her from Him.”

• Saleeby: “He Had Already Been Accused of the Things Prior… Which I Found Out…”
• Saleeby Acknowledges the Gravity of the Situation: “I’ll Tell You This, In the Climate That’s Going Now, He Definitely Would Have Been Fired.”….

Immigration:

ILLEGAL ALIEN SLASHED WOMAN’S THROAT IN NORTH DAKOTA

Akmal Rashidovich Azizov, 21, stalked a female University of North Dakota student in September 2018 with the apparent plan to attack and kill her. He confessed to authorities he had been stalking the woman for weeks after he became convinced she was wicked, according to published reports.

Azizov told investigators “he needed to slay her,” according to the Grand Forks Herald.

He bought an antique silver pocket knife online — as he apparently thought silver was the only way to kill her — and followed her to her apartment.

ILLEGAL ALIEN CHARGED WITH RAPING 12-YEAR-OLD GIRL AT KNIFEPOINT

Jose Chavarria, 19, was booked Oct. 13 with first-degree rape, aggravated crime against nature, aggravated assault, simple assault, resisting an officer and illegally carrying weapons, authorities said.

Chavarria is accused of attacking the girl Oct. 13 at a residence on Tallow Tree Lane in Harvey, according to Capt. Jason Rivarde, spokesman for the Sheriff’s Office. Chavarria is known to the girl’s family, authorities said.

Chavarria is also accused of struggling with deputies when they took him into custody. During the scuffle, a folding knife fell out of Chavarria’s pocket, Rivarde said.

ILLEGAL ALIEN ADMITS TO DOUBLE-MURDER IN NORTH CAROLINA

Gonzalo Salinas-Cisheros, 24, was charged with two counts of murder after 43-year-old Brandi Rodriquez and her 24-year-old son, Jessie Rodriquez, were found shot to death inside his home on White Tail Circle in Conover.

Investigators said a witness told them Salinas-Cisheros and the victims had been smoking meth before the shooting.

Search warrants said that, when Salinas-Cisheros was taken into custody, he admitted to investigators that he murdered both the mother and her son.

Politics:

Unearthed 2004 Elizabeth Warren op-ed railed against class warfare: ‘The rich are not the enemy’

The op-ed, titled “The Vital Middle,” was published on July 16, 2004, as part of a special report from The American Prospect on then-Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry.

The Massachusetts Democrat, who was a Harvard Law School professor at the time, used the piece to offer advice to Kerry.

Some of the viewpoints are familiar—like going after corporate welfare and pushing health insurance for all—but others seem far more moderate than Warren’s current attitude toward the wealthy.

“It is not about class warfare,” Warren wrote. “The rich are not the enemy—in fact, most of us would like to be rich.”

House Republicans release plan in bid to fulfill Trump promise as ‘party of health care’

The 66-page framework seeks to “transform the individual marketplace’s current regulatory structure, unwind the ACA’s Washington-centric approach and largely return regulatory authority to individual states.”

This includes provisions to increase the portability of health insurance within the individual marketplace, provide federal funding for state-designed “guaranteed coverage pools” which would help cover individuals with pre-existing conditions — though it does not require states to run such pools — put a moratorium on Medicaid expansions so it can be “sustainable … for generations to come” and promotes “innovative care” such as telemedicine.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi dismissed the RSC’s ideas, criticizing Republicans for not bringing Democrats into the fold on their plans to replace the Affordable Care Act.

George W. Bush: Trump’s ‘Isolationist’ America Is ‘Dangerous’ for Global Peace

President George W. Bush. Photo by Eric Draper, White House.

Commentary/Opinion Bush led the U.S. into war in Afghanistan and Iraq with more than 4,500 Americans dying in Iraq — including more than 3,500 killed in combat — and up to 205,000 Iraqi citizens dying in the war since March 2003.

In total, Bush’s post-9/11 wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and intervention in Pakistan have resulted in the deaths of between 480,000 and 507,000 people — including nearly 7,000 American soldiers who had deployed to the regions.

Today, the overwhelming majority of American Veterans and all U.S. voters say that Bush’s wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were “not worth fighting” more than a decade later, the latest Pew Research Center survey finds.

Likewise, nearly six-in-ten voters say U.S. military intervention in Syria is not worth fighting or risking American lives.

Bush, according to Rogin, also said his biggest regret as president from 2001 to 2008 was not passing an amnesty for the 11 to 22 million illegal aliens living in the U.S., seemingly attacking the Trump administration’s focus on enforcement of immigration law that has helped boost wages for blue-collar and working-class Americans.

Bush’s continued attacks on Trump and his “America First” agenda stand in contrast to the former president’s history of refusing to denounce the far-left policies of Obama.

“I don’t think it’s good for the country to have a former president undermine a current president,” Bush said in 2014. “I think it’s bad for the presidency for that matter.”

More Voters Believe Officials Broke Law Trying to Prevent Trump Presidency: Poll

President Donald Trump speaks to media before departing the White House on Marine One on Oct. 11, 2019.
President Donald Trump speaks to media before departing the White House on Marine One on Oct. 11, 2019. (Charlotte Cuthbertson/The Epoch Times)

The survey of about 1,000 likely voters across the United States conducted Oct. 9-10 showed that 51 percent think it is likely that “senior federal law enforcement officials broke the law in an effort to prevent Trump from becoming president.” That figure includes 34 percent who say it is “very likely.”

Meanwhile, of the 36 percent who indicated “unlikely,” 22 percent had indicated “not at all likely,” according to the poll.

The remaining 13 percent had voted “not sure.”

Voters were also asked the question,”[o]n the basis of investigative findings to date, which 2016 presidential campaign is more likely to have illegally colluded with foreign operatives—Donald Trump’s or Hillary Clinton’s?” For this, poll results were evenly divided.

Watchdog Says Benghazi Coverup Discussed on Emails to Clinton’s Unsecured Server

Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the September 11, 2012 attack on the US mission in Benghazi, Libya, during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 23, 2013
Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the September 11, 2012 attack on the US mission in Benghazi, Libya, during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on Jan. 23, 2013.
(SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. District Court Judge Royce C. Lamberth, who has heard much of the Judicial Watch litigation seeking the documents, has called Clinton’s private email system “one of the gravest modern offenses against government transparency.”

Sullivan’s comment that “the real story may have been obvious to you from the start” indicates Clinton suppressed her initial view that the attack had been planned beforehand and instead, for several days afterward, she publicly attributed it to “spontaneous” protests sparked by the internet video.

The first IC talking point stated that “currently available information suggests that the demonstrations in Benghazi were spontaneously inspired by the protests at the US Embassy in Cairo and evolved into a direct assault against the US Consulate and subsequently its annex. There are indications that extremists participated in the violent demonstrations.”

Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton said in a statement accompanying the release of the Sullivan email chain that “the State Department wanted to hide the Benghazi connection to the Clinton email scheme.

Rather than defending her email misconduct, the Justice Department has more than enough evidence to reopen its investigations into Hillary Clinton.”

Jill Stein The Cold War is used to stifle dissent in the democrat party

Commentary/Opinion: Jill Stein: The Cold War is used to stifle dissent, differing opinions in Democratic Party.

Former presidential candidate Dr. Jill Stein responds to Hillary Clinton’s claims of Russian ties about Stein and Rep. Gabbard.

Hillary Clinton spreads vicious lies about fellow Democrats

Commentary/Opinion: Tucker: Hillary Clinton spreads vicious lies about fellow Democrats.

Hillary Clinton accuses presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and former candidate Jill Stein of being ‘Russian assets.’

HUD Secretary Carson clashes with Dem rep over withheld Puerto Rico funds: ‘Nothing to hide’

The dispute centered on HUD missing a deadline to give Puerto Rico instructions on how to apply for $8.3 billion in aid to prevent damage from future natural disasters.

A bill signed by President Trump in June gave HUD a 90-day deadline to provide those rules, Newsweek reported. Ten jurisdictions included in the bill got the directions they needed, with Puerto Rico being the only one left out.

Carson was grilled by the congresswoman on the apparent decision to withhold funding over concerns about the government’s management.

Pelosi drug plan hits resistance from left

Rep. Rosa DeLauro argued that Democrats shouldn’t water down key priorities in Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s drug pricing bill. | Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

The hourlong meeting, which several people described as tense, underscores the challenge for House Democratic leaders to swiftly pass the landmark health bill without exposing lingering divisions between the caucus’ left and moderate flanks.

The bill, which is already broadly backed within the caucus, could reach the floor as soon as next week.

Democratic leaders have touted their legislation as lifting the ban on negotiations.

But in reality, the bill only creates an narrow exception to the clause — a minor difference that some Democrats worry could fuel attacks down the road for overselling one of its core provisions.

Massachusetts Legislator Proposes $200 Fines, 6 Months in Jail for Using the Word ‘Bitch’

(Dave Newman/Dreamstime.com)

State Rep. Daniel Hunt (D–Boston) has put forward H. 3719 that would prohibit the use of the big, bad b-word when deployed to “to accost, annoy, degrade or demean” another person. Anyone who did so would be considered a “disorderly person” under state law.

Penalties could include fines of up to $200 or six months in jail. Hunt’s bill specifies that either the person called a bitch or a witness to the bitch-calling could report the crime to the police.

Hunt introduced the bill back in May. It was assigned to the Massachusetts legislature’s Joint Committee on the Judiciary last week, which will have a hearing on it today.

Grassley Suspects ‘Deep State’ Is Responsible For Delay In FISA Abuse Report

“All of the delays and excuses why the Horowitz IG FISA report isn’t public yet after several months of anticipation of its issues leads me to the suspicion it’s going to be ‘deep six’ by the deep state,” Grassley wrote on Twitter.

Horowitz told several congressional committees on June 25 that the investigation was nearing completion. He submitted the report to the Justice Department and FBI for a declassification review on Sept. 13.

Fox News reported in October that disagreements between the FBI and Justice Department about redactions in the report have delayed the release of the document.

Grassley has been one of only a handful of Senate Republicans to push for answers from the FBI and Justice Department about the Steele dossier and other surveillance against the Trump campaign.

Rand Paul says Graham needs to get to bottom of the Russia probe

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul on Sen. Graham’s promises to investigate Russia probe, Roger Stone raid on ‘Tucker Carlson Tonight.

World News:

Demonstrators clash with members of the security forces during a protest in Valparaiso on October 21, 2019. #17
Demonstrators clash with members of the security forces during a protest in Valparaiso on October 21, 2019. #17 Rodrigo Garrido / Reuters

Although Chile’s President Sebastián Piñera has now suspended the fare hike, the protests grew, fueled by wider complaints about the rising cost of living and social and economic inequality.

Piñera has declared a state of emergency, including overnight curfews, as some demonstrations have devolved into looting and arson.

Authorities say 15 people have lost their lives so far amid clashes with riot police and chaotic scenes in damaged and burning buildings.

Northern Ireland to legalize abortion, same-sex marriage

Pro-choice activists take part in a photo call in the grounds of Stormont Parliament, Belfast, Monday Oct. 21, 2019.
Pro-choice activists take part in a photo call in the grounds of Stormont Parliament, Belfast, Monday Oct. 21, 2019. Abortion is set to be decriminalized and same-sex marriage legalized in Northern Ireland as of midnight, bringing its laws in line with the rest of the U.K. (PA via AP)

The country’s conservative Democratic Unionist Party attempted to organize the legislative groups Monday to stop the laws from passing but came up short after many officials protested and the assembly failed to elect a new speaker.

“This is not a day of celebration for the unborn,” DUP leader Arlene Foster said in front of the NI’s Stormont Assembly.

“This is not the end of the matter as far as this party is concerned, we will take every possible legal option open to us.”

Russia, Turkey Agree on Removing Kurds From Turkey-Syria Border

Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan shake hands during a joint press conference following their talks in the Black sea resort of Sochi on Oct. 22, 2019.
Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan shake hands during a joint press conference following their talks in the Black sea resort of Sochi on Oct. 22, 2019. (Sergei Chirikov/AFP via Getty Images)

After several hours of talks, the two leaders said a “safe zone” would be implemented in northeastern Syria, and they would initiate joint patrols in the area.

The announcement comes days after Turkey incurred into northern Syria on Oct. 9 to remove Kurdish fighters that it has described as “terrorists” from the area.

According to the deal, starting on Wednesday, Russian forces and Syrian border guards will “facilitate the removal of [Kurdish] YPG elements and their weapons to the depth” of 30 kilometers (20 miles) from the Turkish-Syrian border.

The YPG, the key component in the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) that have for years fought alongside U.S. troops against ISIS, will also leave the towns of Tel Rifaat and Manbij under the deal, Reuters reported.

“This operation also guarantees Syria’s territorial integrity and political unity… We never had any interest in Syria’s land and sovereignty,” Erdogan said at the press conference.

“The main aim of the operation is to take out PKK/YPG terror organizations from the area and to facilitate the return of Syrian refugees,” he remarked.

British Parliament finally approves Boris Johnson’s Brexit bill – but moments later votes down three-day timetable

The United Kingdom’s divorce from the European Union passed one major hurdle Tuesday when Parliament lawmakers approved Boris Johnson’s Brexit bill but hit a roadblock when a three-day timetable was voted down.

The House of Commons passed the Withdrawal Agreement Bill by a 30-point majority, with the ayes getting 329 votes, over 299 by the Noes.

Then lawmakers quickly voted down Johnson’s a three-day timetable by a 14-point margin.

The vote likely makes it impossible for Johnson to fulfill his vow to take Britain out of the EU by the Oct. 31 deadline.

6 Russian warplanes enter South Korean air defense zone as South Korea scrambles fighter jets

An F-15K Slam Eagle, Republic of Korea Air Forces’, 11th A South Korean air force F-15K Slam Eagle from the 11th Tactical Fighter Wing takes off while participating in the Buddy Wing Exercise March 10 at Kunsan Air Base, South Korea.
(U.S. Air Force poto/Senior Airman Angela Ruiz)

Over several hours, Russian bombers and other warplanes – six total aircraft – entered the Korea Air Defense Identification Zone (KADIZ) for the 20th time this year, ignoring the unique protocol required for foreign aircraft to identify themselves, Reuters reported.

“Our military urgently dispatched fighter jets to track and monitor the aircraft and broadcast warning messages,” the South Korea Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) said in a statement

The Russian Defense Ministry claimed that the Russian strategic bombers didn’t violate foreign borders during flights, which it said were scheduled over neutral waters around Japan, the Yellow Sea, and the East China Sea.

Norway ambulance hijack: Oslo rampage leaves three hurt

Police say a man stole the ambulance on Tuesday afternoon and drove it at pedestrians in the capital.

“We have taken control of an ambulance that was stolen by an armed man,” Oslo police said on Twitter.

“Shots were fired to arrest the suspect, he is not seriously injured,” they added.

“A woman with a pram and an elderly couple were run over or had to throw themselves out of the way” of the stolen vehicle, police said in another Twitter post.

An Oslo University hospital spokesman told the Reuters news agency that seven-month-old twins were injured.

Protests in Lebanon Are Entering Their Sixth Day. See How the Extraordinary Revolt Is Unfolding

Nour, Nour and Farah attend a mass protest in Beirut on Oct. 18, 2019.
Nour, Nour and Farah attend a mass protest in Beirut on Oct. 18, 2019. Myriam Boulos

Lebanese protesters say their politicians have stolen tens, or even hundreds, of billions of dollars from them, aided by laws that allow bank secrecy.

The demonstrations began Thursday after the government announced new taxes, including a $6 monthly fee on calls on free messaging apps like WhatsApp, unleashing anger against decades of corruption, government mismanagement and nepotism.

Lebanon’s economy is stagnating and the country has one of the world’s highest debt to GDP ratios. Economists have warned of a complete economic collapse.

In recent weeks, banks have restricted the withdrawal of U.S. dollars.

Taliban attacks kill 15 policemen in northern Afghanistan

An Afghan National Army Commando squad conducts live fire exercises during training at Camp Pamir, Kunduz province, Afghanistan, Feb. 13, 2018. Commandos spearheaded the Afghan National Army 20th Division's clearance of 25 square miles of terrain in Balkh province, Feb, 24-26.
An Afghan National Army Commando squad conducts live fire exercises during training at Camp Pamir, Kunduz province, Afghanistan, Feb. 13, 2018. Commandos spearheaded the Afghan National Army 20th Division’s clearance of 25 square miles of terrain in Balkh province, Feb, 24-26.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sean Carnes)

Ghulam Rabbani Rabbani said the officers were killed on October 22 when Taliban fighters attacked a checkpoint in Ali Abad district and ambushed security forces in the same area.

A Taliban spokesman confirmed the group was behind the assaults, which comes as Afghan forces have been battling the extremist group for the past few weeks in the province’s Dashti Archi and Imam Sahib districts, according to Rabbani.

Taliban fighters are said to control several districts in Kunduz Province.

Commentary/Opinion:

These Are The 4 Questions of Life We Must Face(Pt. 3) | Ravi Zacharias | SPIRITUALITY | Rubin Report

Dave Rubin of The Rubin Report talks to Ravi Zacharias (Founder & President of RZIM) the author of “The Logic of God” about the big questions of life.

Ravi gives his thoughts on what he thinks the four big questions are that we all must pursue and try to answer in our lives to find meaning and a sense of purpose.

He talks about why he’s concerned about global powers like China and Russia that do not have a strong belief in God.

He also discusses why despite their differences in faith and religion, he and Dennis Prager’s worldviews share some similarities, and why politics are a necessary evil.